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At the Museums: Treasures of the Indus Volume 51 Number 1, January/February 1998
by Angela M.H. Schuster

[image]5,000-year-old figurine from Mehrgarh [LARGER IMAGE] (Courtesy J.M. Kenoyer and Department of Archaeology and Museums, Pakistan)

Priest-King of Mohenjo-daro carved from white, low-fired steatite (Courtesy J.M. Kenoyer and Department of Archaeology and Museums, Pakistan) [LARGER IMAGE] [image]

For nearly a millennium, the people of the Indus Valley dominated most of what is now Pakistan and northwestern India, trading throughout the region and building vast cities along the Indus River and its tributaries. On February 11, Great Cities, Small Treasures: The Ancient World of the Indus Valley opens at the Asia Society in New York, presenting to an American public for the first time more than 100 artifacts from this ancient culture. The exhibition, which provides a comprehensive overview of the Indus civilization from its emergence in the early third millennium B.C. to its collapse sometime in the early second, will be at the Asia Society through May 3, after which it will tour the United States.

* Click here for ARCHAEOLOGY's list of current exhibitions.

Angela M.H. Schuster is an associate editor of ARCHAEOLOGY.

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© 1998 by the Archaeological Institute of America
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