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abstracts
Departments Volume 49 Number 6, November/December 1996
In This Issue
A Tempting Document
A curious manuscript may hold the key to Andean writing. But is it real? By Peter A. Young
From the President
Seeking New Sources of Support
The NEH's archaeological unit has been eliminated, largely cutting off Old World archaeology from federal support. By Stephen L. Dyson
Letters Fort Caroline or Charlesfort?; Happy Birthday Jerusalem?; Hitler's Olympic Torch; The Tragedy of Beirut; Flip of the Coin.
Insight
Window on Ancient Maritime Commerce
A shipwreck off Spain's Costa Brava yields clues to Roman commerce. By James Wiseman
At the Museums
Gallery In Situ
Copán's new museum, which includes a replica of a 1,400-year-old temple known as Rosalila built in an atrium open to the sky, highlights sculptural treasures and a sophisticated Maya cosmology. Reviewed by Angela M.H. Schuster
Books
Digging the Rose and Globe
A new study reassesses Elizabethan playhouses. The Archaeology of Shakespeare: The Material Legacy of Shakespeare's Theatre. By Jean Wilson. 211 pages. Stroud, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, Ltd., 1995. ISBN 0-7509-0926-9. Available from Books International, P.O. Box 605, Herndon, VA 20172-0605, tel. 703-661-1586. $35.95. Reviewed by Ricardo J. Elia.
Multimedia
Mummies Old and New
Ancient "mysteries" from A&E and an experimental re-creation. Mummies and the Wonders of Ancient Egypt. 1996. Four one-hour episodes produced by the Arts & Entertainment Network in associateion with Greystone Communications, Inc. Purchase, $59.95 from A&E, 800-423-1212. Resurrection of an Ancient Art: Mummification. 1994. A 48-minute video produced by Thomas H. Wood. Purchase, $24.95 from T.H. Wood, P.O. Box 65, Merion Station, PA 19066-0065, tel. 610-667-0158. Add $3 shipping for U.S., $4 other Americas, $6 Europe, $8 Asia and Africa. Add 6 percent sales tax if shipped to PA. Reviewed by Robert S. Bianchi.
Forum
Murder in Memphis
Did the Persian emperor Cambyses (sixth century B.C.) in fact murder the Egyptians' sacred Apis bull, as Herodotus reports. By Leo Depuydt
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© 1996 by the Archaeological Institute of America
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