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Table of Contents Volume 58 Number 4, July/August 2005

The full texts of news, reviews, and selected longer articles are available online; abstracts of other departments and features are also available.

Features

A Monumental Feud
Peru's Caral is the oldest city in the western hemisphere--and the focus of archaeology's most contentious fight.
by Roger Atwood

Myth in Marble
A tragic figure emerges from the ruins of a Roman villa.
by Jarrett A. Lobell

Plain of Jars
The explosive implications of archaeology at Laos' most puzzling site
by Karen J. Coates

[cover]

Secrets of the Medici
Excavation of Florence's first family reveals clues to the lifestyles of the Renaissance rich, solves a murder mystery, and turns up a lost treasure.
by Gino Fornaciari, Bob Brier, and Antonio Fornaciari

Watery Tombs
Testimony coerced from shamans by Spanish priests may, ironically, be a key to understanding more about Maya spiritual life.
by Kristin M. Romey

Departments

In This Issue
Turf Wars
by Peter A. Young

From the President
What's in a Word? full
A proposed change to federal law will put our heritage at risk.
by Jane C. Waldbaum

Special Report
The Axum Obelisk Returns,
but Some Still Grumble
 full
by Ian Limbach

News
Tsunami reveals temples in India, Germany's prehistoric pornography, one dapper mummy, Korea's oldest written document-or not, reburying Aztec Ruins, and more

Conversations
Monuments and Memory full

Susan Alcock on how the ancients viewed the past, the upside of empire, and modernizing classical archaeology

Reviews
Dinosaurs in native myths, romantic ruins, return to Armageddon, virtual trowels, from apes to ancestors, and editors' picks

Letter From New York
The New Neandertal full

Virtual fossils and real molecules are changing how we view Neandertals.
by Jean-Jacques Hublin

On the Cover: Impossible to miss, enormous stone vessels lie in the thousands across Laos' Plain of Jars, luring locals, tourists, and archaeologists. But what you can't see is the deadly material beneath them: unexploded ordnance from secret U.S. raids during the Vietnam War. (Photograph by Nick Wheeler)

May/June 2005 | September/October 2005

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© 2005 by the Archaeological Institute of America
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